top of page

Subscribe Form

Thanks for submitting!

Search

Cartoon of the Day

1,822 views28 comments

28 commentaires


Time of arrival, method of arrival, order of arrival have nothing to do with the meaning of "indigenous". Those arguments are mischievious and distract from the fact that iwi, the government, the parliament, the Crown and almost every New Zealander would identify Maori as the indigenous population of NZ


The UN only describes the characteristics of indigenous people, which do apply to Māori. The Oxford English Dictionary (Sept 2022) defines it as follows :

a. Born or originating in a particular place; spec. (now often with capital initial) designating a people or group inhabiting a place before the arrival of (European) settlers or colonizers. Also with to introducing the place in question.
b. Of, relating to, or characteristic of th…
J'aime

With seven different national ethnic tribes arriving here first touch down takes all. They were never one nation. They demonstrated their separateness in war against each other,

J'aime
Michael
Michael
28 mai 2023
En réponse à

That myth that 7 canoes arrived within a short period has been disproven

J'aime

Quoting from an article https://www.nzcpr.com/who-is-indigenous/ by David Round, an eminent law lecturer at the University of Canterbury, there are only 2 possible meanings of the definition of "indigenous" given by the OED definition.


1. being born somewhere; in one sense, all native-born New Zealanders are indigenous.

2. having ancestors who have been there forever.


In his second interpretation David specifically excludes all Europeans (apart from the Sami) from being indigenous to the lands they may have occupied for thousands of years.


The definition correlates with Geoff's point that indigenous refers to people in the country from the beginning, and Franksharp's note that you cannot be indigenous if you came from somewhere else. But IF we agree with David Round's analysi…


J'aime

According to Franksharp's interpretation (the OED published by the OUP states: "indigenous --- belonging to a particular place rather than coming to it from somewhere else"), anybody born in NZ is indigenous to the place. By definition that would mean Maori are definitely indigenous to NZ.

J'aime
En réponse à

Sorry, Pete, but that is not my definition. It is the definition of OED published by the OUP.. The definition makes clear that Maori are not indigenous but are immigrants as they came to what is known as New Zealand from somewhere else. "Somewhere else" is from various Pacific Islands, not all from the same place, and they came at different times, Their DNA demonstrates that they originated from what is now known as the area of Viet Nam.

J'aime

Maori are definitely not indigenous, they are immigrants into NZ the same as anyone else, and they clearly state as much in their own recited history.


The OED published by the OUP states: "indigenous --- belonging to a particular place rather than coming to it from somewhere else"

Now what could be clearer than that ?

J'aime
Michael
Michael
28 mai 2023
En réponse à

“If you want me to go on arguing, you'll have to pay for another five minutes.”

Monty Python

J'aime
bottom of page