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Defending democracy is tough these days

Unless you’ve been living under a stone, you will know that when David Seymour was bold enough to disclose the special code which allowed Maori New Zealanders in Auckland to get vaccinated without needing to make an appointment, he was dumped on from a great height by almost everybody on the Left of politics and even by some on the Right, like Shane Reti, National’s Deputy Leader.


All over the country, media attacked him directly or by running articles by those guaranteed to do so.


Eventually, and to their credit, the New Zealand Herald gave Seymour a right of reply and we ran that on our blog yesterday. I thought it was a stunning piece, which put his critics to shame. He made it abundantly clear that New Zealand has no future unless all New Zealanders have equal political rights, no matter where their grandparents were born.


Today, the editorial in Stuff’s Dominion-Post resumed the attack. After noting some of the points Seymour had made about the new History curriculum, Maori co-governance of the Three Waters, the observation of so-called “Treaty principles” in land and water resource use, and the special rights conferred on Maori New Zealanders in the Plant Variety Rights legislation, the editorial innocently asked “why should greater Maori governance or input be seen as a threat by everyone else?”


It is astonishing that the editorial writer needs to have it pointed out that giving a small minority of the population a power of veto over the wishes of the great majority is fundamentally inconsistent with any concept of democracy.


And let’s make no mistake: that’s what is intended in the Government’s He Puapua plan. That plan envisages completely separate spheres of government, one for those who chance to have a Maori ancestor (always now with other ancestors too of course) and one for those who don’t.


We already see the Government setting up a separate Maori Health Authority (with a power of veto over what the health authority serving the rest of the population does); proposing in the Three Waters reform to give iwi 50% of the voting power in the regional water authorities to be established; and requiring special deference be given to all things Maori in the proposed Natural and Built Environments legislation.


Giving a constitutional preference to any person, or any group of persons, simply on the basis of birth is not consistent with our constitution. Yes, I concede the Queen is an exception to that generalization but she carries no meaningful power in our scheme of government.


Unless we reverse this dangerous trend to creating constitutional preference for New Zealanders based on ancestry, it will be a disaster.


3,776 views91 comments

91 Comments


phildrane
phildrane
Sep 20, 2021

Whenever I’m in my homeland, England, people often ask me ”What is the difference between British and New Zealand politics” my response for the past 30 years has been

something along th lines of “NZ politics is mostly centrist, nowhere near as confrontational and polarised as the UK, with Governments that are, in general. trusted by the majority.” When I am next able to visit my homeland the response will be decidedly different because for me those differences are becoming less and less evident.

The definitions below are extracts from the NZ Government’s own website taken today (20/9/21). They wer elikely written a long time ago, so authors' naivety and lack of foresight of the authors might be forgiven. You migh…


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Don`t know if everyone has heard about this. The maori party has started a petition to change the name of our country. This is our time to push back and push back hard !! Taking to the streets in protest ! I believe many many New Zealanders would support this and many more would jump on board after the protest. Not sure how to organise this but I`m going to find out - who`s with me ?

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Don`t know how many subscribers here listen to podcasts. Here`s one that`s inline with this blog and particularly relevant to the future of new Zealand that you shouldn`t miss. Leighton Smith podcast: Muriel Newman discusses democracy, Three Waters and He Puapua. Some of the content and revelations will shock and appall. We need to act before its too late

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phildrane
phildrane
Sep 29, 2021
Replying to

Hi, I'm interested in your comment but there's no link in your reply, I'm wondering of this podcast is still alive somewhere. Youtube perhaps?

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mark. wahlberg
mark. wahlberg
Sep 11, 2021

This is the weekly mayoral chat to ratepayers via our local community newspaper the Bush Telegraph. I appreciate I posted it front to back but I'm quitting while I'm ahead. This weeks message is all about the Tararua District Councils take on the issue of 3 Waters I haven't a clue what the second to last paragraph means.


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ron
ron
Sep 20, 2021
Replying to

The second to last paragraph is at odds with all of the information from elsewhere. The Government bribe is to agree to give away all water assets in return for money to spend on other projects/services but clearly not water as those assets will have disappeared from council ownership and control.

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donaldk
donaldk
Sep 11, 2021

We New Zealanders who see our democratic system of representative democracy dying in front of our eyes, do have a problem, What to do about it?

I note earlier comments referring to Amy Brookes and her 100 days (to stop a new law) message.

She is describing the popular, sometimes called the facultative referendum that the Swiss use to have the last word on any proposed or enacted legislation.

We need to push for electoral reform beginning with a referendum on the Maori roll which is able to give part Maori greater voting power than their numbers deserve.

The best present for New Zealanders is in my opinion the adoption of Direct Democracy as the Swiss enjoy. Both the 100…

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